transpersonal living thinking and living beyond the self

transpersonal living

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  • Halfway to Wholeness By Matthew Mathis Four years ago, after getting up and doing kundalini yoga every single morning from 4:30am to 7am for exactly a year and a half, I discovered a truer meaning of yoga by suddenly stopping. At the soon-to-be-opened Nike store downtown. By working three 14 hour days in a row. Short story: In early 2010, I’d found myself in very close proximity to a yoga studio and then found myself grieving for my mother who had just passed away (http://www.flickr.com/photos/27567474@N06/), and I started doing kundalini yoga one day at Awakenings studio on SE 12th near Belmont in late March and just didn’t stop until late November, a full 19 months later. It was great! Lots of very physically active krias: moving postures of extreme fitness-based balance and meditation. Chanting, praying, exercising, crying, napping, reading, leading, following, stretching, and breathing breathing breathing, etc. — I did it all. Every single morning. What got me to quit wasn’t that I’d cried all my tears out for my mom — I’d certainly shed buckets full (but can always make more!) — what made me finally stop was like a real world real time application of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs; I was broke and needed a job. I mean like zero ...
  • My Women’s March On Washington My Women’s March on Washington — Learning from the humanity of others By Evan Henshaw-Plath Participating in the Women’s March on Washington was a profound, life-changing experience. Coming on the heels of a depressing inauguration, the march was both necessary and inspirational, and I’m glad I went. But, what affected me the most wasn’t the march itself, it was the people who came together to share it. It was the time we spent in the moments between and after the events. The conversations I had and connections I made reassured me that we can achieve a diverse, inclusive, and humane world. My aunt organized a caravan of family and strangers from Iowa and we stayed in two large rental houses. She listed our additional space on MarchBNB and others joined us. The houses ended up reflecting the diversity that we want in America, that we saw in the march, and that we want in our movements. We were: my cousin from rural Minnesota, who’s adopted and raised 5 kids out of foster care; a Lutheran pastor; a couple of gay teenagers from Iowa; my mom from California; myself from Portland, Ore.; an immigrant from El Salvador who spoke minimal English; a grandmother from Panama; twin teenagers from Richmond, Va., their 7-year-old brother, ...
  • The Atheist Default Mode By Christy Oeur Life is a practice and living as an atheist for several years will hone one particular skill quite remarkably – skepticism. Anything that isn’t backed by strong empirical evidence was hardly worth discussing and yet, I discussed such things anyway as a means to humor myself. Perhaps I indulged in such conversations to strengthen my skepticism, the same way I practice scales on a violin; so that each note sounded clearer, more precise, and that the action of my bow was natural. I was becoming a natural skeptic. The more often I reached into my bucket o’ refutations, the easier it was for me to find my refute for the next time I reached in. The more I said, “What are the sources of the argument?” to myself, the easier it was for me to filter out a conversation in real time. A friend would be speaking to me and instead of listening and engaging in my friend’s experience, I would be sorting statements into the “backed by evidence bin” and “utter speculation” bin. Pretty soon, I didn’t even need to think of this process and I could parse the conversation automatically. I was on skeptic autopilot or something I like to call ...
  • Practice of Self-Healing By Anonymous There’s this little thing I do that keeps me centered, calm, cool and collected. Everyday I devote time to this practice, from a few minutes to a few hours. I like to refer to it as a practice of self-healing of inner discovery, and growth. The way I see it is that life is going to force us to grow, and generally its through suffering. Suffering is an interesting idea that Yoga practice can let us explore. We have become so complacent in our lives, mentally and physically we have given up the fight to grow in a direction the spirit wants us to. The path is often not linear, and without a tangible reward. When I roll my mat out I immediately become humble by what is before me, it’s a journey without an end. That alone allows me to be receptive; it’s a complete change from what most of us do all day. Yogis’ use this technique called pratayahara meaning sense withdraws. Yes, on purpose we have selective hearing. Not only that, but also selective eyesight, attention, and awareness. Through going deep within, and filling up we become better at all of the roles we assume in life. Parent, spouse, friend, activist, and teacher…we ...
  • A City Boy With Centered Tendencies By Julian Gudger I was born and raised in the inner city of the Nation’s Capital. The rule for Saturday mornings was to disappear until Momma finished cleaning the house, which meant I was out playing from the moment I awoke until I was hungry for a midday refueling. Most of my memories about early school surround playing on the field, running at neck-breaking speed, and feeling like that hour of recess lasted a lot longer. I was a latchkey kid, so after school agendas usually involved more outdoor play until dinner. In the summer, you went back outside until the streetlights came on. As a child, I watched the old folks do things old folks do. On weekends, it wasn’t unusual to see a gathering of old men in those canvas folding chairs along some field’s edge.It seemed like every older person, man or women, kept little garden plots in the small front yards or, if they lived in apartments, their window boxes. They sat out on porches at night. A “Hello, Mr. Jenkins!” usually initiated a quick interrogation about your academic performance or a request to run to the store for lunchmeat, beer, and cigarettes. Hey, it was the early 80s. Regardless of levels of ...
  • Breaking Down Walls: One Woman’s Journey By Anonymous My 35th birthday fell on Father’s Day this year. I’ve been watching Brene Brown videos on youtube every time I get restless and am in need of a breakthrough. I’d been thinking about walls and coming out from behind them and vulnerability and all of the things that Brene Brown says spurs creativity and change and happiness. My life coach recently told me that I have packed a lot of living into my 35 years. I’ve been actively deconstructing what those 35 years have taught me in order to live the next 35 years even better. You get to a certain point in your life and realize that what you risk in staying behind your walls can be just as big, if not bigger, than coming out from behind them and being vulnerable. Think about it, the longer you keep your walls up, the longer you are alone, without any true connection to the outside world. Experience ingrains in us that letting down our walls leads to hurt. Which brings us to the question: what hurt caused you to put up that original wall? How old were you when that happened? Are you walls still intact? Are they thicker? Are there cracks that you can ...
  • A Transformative Journey Ryan Hammer, of Chicago Illinois, shares his own transformative journey through his experience in the creative process of making music and cultivating coffee. Movers Makers Groovers & Shakers – Ep 02 from RottoBella on Vimeo.
  • Your Sanctuary By Susan Kulka   For many years I have heard about having your own personal space for winding down, reflection, and reading or praying, – your sanctuary. This idea stayed on the back burner as I go on retreats, visit the adoration chapel in my parish church and have many places I visit to unwind and to reflect. Then this past Spring, when I was recovering from an energy zapping illness, I found I did not have the drive to run around like I usually do, nor the intent to escape to my familiar outlets, so as I was gardening one day in my yard, when all of a sudden the sky changed, it went to a deep saturated hue of blue and it looked like it was going to rain. The wind kicked up and there was that strong breeze in the air that makes you look up, you know something is coming. I felt like I was one with nature in those moments, and I felt like I was wrapped up and held by the wind. Oh, I love the feeling of an impending storm! Its a waiting and anticipation feeling, and it is so inviting! I plunked myself down under the tree we have in our ...
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